Category Archives: Mindfulness

Stepping Up and Forward

I have been away from this blog for a while when life and career took a few turns. From December 2012 to November 2014 I directed Energize Everett, a community health outreach program in Everett MA. I took a floundering … Continue reading

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Bowing to Our Neighbors

When my sons were small they loved watching Mr. Rogers. I can’t say I loved watching Mr. Rogers, though I was thrilled they did because he was so kind and the show was so calm. But when Mr. Rogers died, … Continue reading

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Violence of Technology

Building on the previous post and how we do violence to ourselves through “well-intentioned” over-commitment, this is a brief consideration of the violent consequences of technological approaches driven solely by expediency and efficiency. When measuring human success, we use terms borrowed from technology, words and … Continue reading

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Well-Intentioned Violence

My weeks away from here have been consumed writing a grant due May 30th. This grant money replaces federal money recently cut from our program, so there’s a lot of pressure to succeed. Intense periods periods of work test the … Continue reading

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#3 Execute: A Feeling of Strength in Reserve

To pursue the disciplined pursuit of less, Greg McKeown says successful people use routine and ritual to focus on the essential. Artists in all disciplines intimately understand the power of routine. In 2006, Twyla Tharp called creativity a habit in her book, The Creative Habit, and … Continue reading

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#2 Eliminate Deliberately with Purpose

I could not possibly explain the importance of saying no–point #2–better than this. “If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just … Continue reading

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#1 Explore and Evaluate

I’d like to review Greg McKeown’s work for this and the next few posts. He distils his essentialism advice to 3 points: Explore/Evaluate Eliminate Execute In order to get to the essential and discard the unessential McKeown suggests constantly narrowing the … Continue reading

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